The SBAC & PARCC Tests Are Fake! “Validated” with Fake Research!

The tests are invalid, the results are invalid, the motives behind them; nothing short of sinister, and the pain and suffering caused by all of this is inexcusable. The fact that it has gone on this long and Bill Gates has the arrogance and audacity to think that teachers, students and parents are going to continue to put up with this is because the pushback from teachers and parents has not been strong enough.

EXPOSED!

The SBAC & PARCC Tests Are Fake! “Validated” with Fake Research!

by Deb Herbage

What happens when you have a group of people, corporations, foundations, government entities, politicians and billionaires force 48 states to adopt and implement their standards that were thrown together and written by non-educators in secrecy, with no transparency, that are developmentally inappropriate for all grade levels?   What happens when you have that same group of people, corporations, foundations, government entities, politicians and billionaire then make tests based on those developmentally inappropriate standards that they claim are “high-quality”, “internationally-benchmarked”, “rigorous” and that are supposed indicators of “college and career readiness”? You have the Common Core State Standards and the SBAC (Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium) and PARCC (Partnership Assessment for the Readiness for College & Career) tests that have been bought and paid for by 48 states for multi-million dollar contracts.

The SBAC and PARCC tests are FAKE…

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Goldman Sachs explains: social impact bonds are socially bankrupt

If you are going to have taxpayer funded schools, then you need schools that are locally controlled by the communities they serve. You need locally elected school boards who are held to the standard of nothing less than 100% transparency for all related actions. I wish the reformers would try selling the Brooklyn Bridge, then more people might actually notice they are being scammed .

mathbabe

Have you ever heard of a social impact bond? It’s a kooky financial instrument – a bond that “pays off” when some socially desirable outcome is reached.

The idea is that people with money put that money to some “positive” purpose, and if it works out they get their money back with a bonus for a job well done. It’s meant to incentivize socially positive change in the market. Instead of only caring about profit, the reasoning goes, social impact bonds will give rich people and companies a reason to care about healthy communities.

So, for example, New York City issued a social impact bond in 2012 around recidivism for jails. Recidivism, which is the tendency for people to return to prison, has to go down for the bond to pay off. So Goldman Sachs made a bet that they could lower the recidivism rate for certain jails in…

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New Hampshire’s Senate Bill 503 Would Allow “Pay For Success” Social Impact Bonds In Pre-Schools

This is deeply troublesome. When did denying children a FAPE become both legal and profitable?

Exceptional Delaware 2017

New Hampshire has a current bill which would allow investors to finance pre-schools in an effort to prevent special education remediation.  This “pay for success” program is actually Social Impact Bonds.  This latest craze by investors in education is extremely dangerous and should not even be a consideration anywhere in a child’s education.  It is a system that has the potential to be widely abused in order for outside corporations to make money off student outcomes.

New Hampshire’s Senate Bill 503 has already gone through their Senate and will be heard in their House Education Committee on Tuesday, April 5th at 10am in the New Hampshire General Court.

I have to wonder what state legislators across the country are even thinking anymore.  They are selling out public education to corporations and investors.  New Hampshire couldn’t even give this an accurate fiscal note because it is, when you break it down…

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Governor Markell Praises Pathways To Prosperity But True Issue Is Impact On Labor Market

This is the reality of Workforce Development and the shift from inquiry based learning and classical education. The tests and the rest of the garbage aren’t just for money making (although they are very, very good at this.) They also help to foster in a planned economy. I propose that this is why you now see so many deserving students denied opportunities, like advanced math, or pushed in one direction instead of another. Who’s doing the planning? It  certainly isn’t the parents, students and teachers; the real stakeholders.

Exceptional Delaware 2017

In his weekly address, Delaware Governor Jack Markell talked about the Pathways to Prosperity initiative which seems to be his main focus these days.  Remember the “Dear Hillary” letter?  It is no coincidence the Pathways to Prosperity push in Delaware is happening the same time Hillary Clinton is about to secure the Democratic nomination for the next President of the USA.  In the latest “Will he or won’t he?”, Politico talked about the prospect of Jack Markell being Hillary’s nomination for the US Secretary of Education.

But neither Clinton, nor anyone close to her, has approached him about the job, he said. Markell said he’s focused on the final months of his tenure. He’s not sure what he wants to do next, but if it’s education-related, Markell said he’d like an opportunity to work closer to students so he could have more of a direct impact. The position of…

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The Sales Pitch

Below is a great piece by Emily Talmage. Reading it, I couldn’t help but be reminiscent of my exchange with New Hampshire’s Board of Education chair, Tom Raffio. It went something like this: toomuchtesting

(Credit for the above photo goes to an anonymous testing company whistle blower.)

To be fair, it actually went more like this:

“Just to be clear, Londonderry has not rejected SBAC, which is a great advance over previous tests. But whatever test is used, you’re right, teaching to the test is a waste of time. It’s not helpful for students or teachers. Parents want what’s best for their kids and a good test helps them get that. The new tests are an improvement and now help parents get the information they need. And the tests help students learn by asking them to apply their knowledge to new problems. Students no longer fill in the blanks. They demonstrate that they understand the material.” – Tom Raffio

Rehearsed and overly formulaic; at least they’re predictable. 

Who Said It?

The Disturbing Transformation of Kindergarten

Americas Education Watch

nclbOne of the most distressing characteristics of education reformers is that they are hyper-focused on how students perform, but they ignore how students learn. Nowhere is this misplaced emphasis more apparent, and more damaging, than in kindergarten.

A new University of Virginia study found that kindergarten changed in disturbing ways from 1999-2006. There was a marked decline in exposure to social studies, science, music, art and physical education and an increased emphasis on reading instruction. Teachers reported spending as much time on reading as all other subjects combined.

The time spent in child-selected activity dropped by more than one-third. Direct instruction and testing increased. Moreover, more teachers reported holding all children to the same standard.

How can teachers hold all children to the same standards when they are not all the same? They learn differently, mature at different stages – they just are not all the same especially at the…

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The PARCC Test: Exposed

This is fantastic.

Outrage on the Page

The author of this blog posting is a public school teacher who will remain anonymous.

I will not reveal my district or my role due to the intense legal ramifications for exercising my Constitutional First Amendment rights in a public forum. I was compelled to sign a security form that stated I would not be “Revealing or discussing passages or test items with anyone, including students and school staff, through verbal exchange, email, social media, or any other form of communication” as this would be considered a “Security Breach.” In response to this demand, I can only ask—whom are we protecting?

There are layers of not-so-subtle issues that need to be aired as a result of national and state testing policies that are dominating children’s lives in America. As any well prepared educator knows, curriculum planning and teaching requires knowing how you will assess your students and planning backwards from…

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